Gynaecology and Women's Health

Female hormones ‘may trigger migraines in adolescent girls’

Changes in female hormones may cause headaches in adolescent girls, but their effect may depend on a girl’s age and stage of pubertal development, according to a new study. Conducted by researchers at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical...

Standard UTI testing 'doesn't diagnose all cases of infection'

Women who are suffering from pain when going to the toilet or who constantly feel they need to urinate are likely to have a urinary tract infection (UTI), even if tests come back negative for bacterial infection. Around a quarter of UTI cases do not show up when using standard testing, meaning...

Gene discovery could lead to chlamydia cure

Researchers have discovered genes that can affect how the immune system reacts to infections, which they believe could lead to development of a cure for chlamydia. The sexually transmitted disease (STD) is one of the most common in Britain and usually does not present symptoms in the early stages...

Cheap drug could save thousands from post-partum bleeding

A widely available drug could dramatically reduce the risk of death associated with bleeding after childbirth. A new study tested 20,000 women from around the world to see if the drug tranexamic (TXA) was beneficial. It was found that death as a result of bleeding was reduced by around 31 per cent...

Women's wellbeing 'negatively impacted by contraceptive pill'

Women's general wellbeing can be severely affected by the pill, according to new research. Scientists from Sweden have found that healthy women who take the combined contraceptive pill estimate their quality of life being lower than those who don't. The combined contraceptive pill is one of...

Sperm could be used to deliver targeted cancer treatment

Doctors are looking at the drug delivery opportunities that could be provided by human sperm. Researchers from the Institute for Integrative Nanosciences in Germany have started researching the possibility of using sperm to deliver medication to female cancer patients. The team found that sperm...

Glucose sensor could mean end of diabetics' finger prick tests

A new sensor placed under the skin could remove the need for diabetics to perform frequent finger prick tests. The small sensor called Eversense is implanted under the skin, allowing it to monitor blood sugar levels by testing the fluid just below the skin. This information is then relayed to a...

Vaginal bacteria could be responsible for recurrent UTIs

A vaginal bacteria could trigger recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) among women, scientists have found. The discovery could point to why sexual activity can trigger UTIs. The bacteria Gardnerella vaginalis can make dormant E. coli left from a previous infection to start multiplying again,...

Period syncing myth debunked

Menstrual cycles do not actually sync up between women who spend a lot of time together, new research has found. Despite the fact that no scientific studies have been able to prove the theory that those with uteruses can experience synced cycles, the idea has become almost fact. However, a new...

Study: Women more likely to be exposed to indoor air pollution

New research has shown that in countries where gender inequalities are most pronounced, women are far more likely to be exposed to solid fuel - including burning from wood, crop wastes, charcoal and dung - and the negative consequences that result from them. Kelly Austin, a sociologist at Lehigh...