News

FIGO supports the International Day of Action for Women's Health 2017

FIGO supports the International Day of Action for Women's Health 2017 (28 May). Click here for more information. Join in the campaign...

FIGO congratulates new Director-General of WHO

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has been elected as the new Director-General of WHO. FIGO extends sincere congratulations to him. He has confirmed attendance at the next FIGO World Congress in Rio de Janeiro, in October 2018. Pictured at the World Health Assembly in Geneva: L-R: Professor C N...

FIGO Secretariat awarded SILVER by ‘Investors in the Environment’!

We started working with Investors in the Environment (IIE) towards reducing our impact on the environment in early 2016. We are now excited to announce that we have been awarded the ‘Silver’ level accreditation, scoring over 90 per cent in this category! We will now be putting all...

Female hormones ‘may trigger migraines in adolescent girls’

Changes in female hormones may cause headaches in adolescent girls, but their effect may depend on a girl’s age and stage of pubertal development, according to a new study. Conducted by researchers at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical...

Teenager designs breast cancer-detecting bra

A teenager in Mexico has designed a bra that could detect breast cancer in women who are predisposed to the disease. Julian Rios Cantu developed the bra after his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. He then started a company with three friends to produce the bra. Speaking in a video posted on...

Folic acid throughout pregnancy ‘can boost children’s resilience’

Taking folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy enhances psychological development in children, says new research carried out by the University of Ulster, UK. According to the researchers, it is widely accepted that taking folic acid in the first trimester of pregnancy can benefit children...

FIGO supports International Day of the Midwife 2017

Statement from the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) on the International Day of the Midwife 2017. Please click here to view the statement.

Period tracking apps often ‘disappoint’

Smartphone apps used to track menstrual cycles are often disappointing to users, according to a new study conducted by the University of Washington (UW), US. The researchers said that many apps display a lack of accuracy, assumptions about sexual identity and partners, and “an emphasis on...

Common antibiotics linked to miscarriage risk

A number of antibiotics have been linked to an increased risk of miscarriage in early pregnancy, according to a new study. Conducted by the Université de Montréal, Canada, the research pointed to the commonly used medications macrolides, quinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides and...

Potential new ovarian cancer treatment discovered

New research may reveal why up to 85 per cent of women experience recurrence of high-grade serous ovarian cancer - which is the most common subtype of ovarian cancer - after treatment with the chemotherapy drug carboplatin. The research, carried out by Dr Sanaz Memarzadeh, of the Eli and Edythe...

Women ‘should continue to be screened for cervical cancer after 65’

A new study has found that women should continue to be screened for cervical cancer after the age of 65. The study, led by Dr Mary White, chief of the Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Georgia, US,...

Standard UTI testing 'doesn't diagnose all cases of infection'

Women who are suffering from pain when going to the toilet or who constantly feel they need to urinate are likely to have a urinary tract infection (UTI), even if tests come back negative for bacterial infection. Around a quarter of UTI cases do not show up when using standard testing, meaning...

New evidence suggests low-cost drug should become frontline response for major blood loss after childbirth

More than 100,000 women globally die each year from severe bleeding after childbirth. A major trial of 20,000 women found that a low-cost drug called tranexamic acid reduced deaths due to bleeding by a third. If this treatment is used quickly, it could save the lives of thousands of new mothers...