News

FIGO recruiting for new Conference Manager

FIGO is seeking to recruit a new Conference Manager . It is the only organisation that brings together professional societies of obstetricians and gynecologists on a global basis. For over 60 years FIGO has collaborated with the world's top health and donor bodies. FIGO currently has Member...

Misoprostol Dosage Chart - new release!

The new FIGO 2017 misoprostol-only dosage chart has been released! An update from the widely used 2012 chart detailing recommended dosages of misoprostol when used by itself for a variety of gynecological and obstetrical indications has been revised and expanded by an expert group and is now...

IJGO impact factor soars to 2.174!

FIGO's journal, the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (IJGO), has seen its impact factor soar to 2.174, its highest ever! The journal’s ranking has also increased to 36/79 journals (up from 47/80). Visit the journal online. Follow IJGO on Twitter. Visit the IJGO Facebook...

Doctors may be able to predict newborn health during pregnancy

Specific genetic changes in the placentas of women could have an impact on the health of newborns, a new study has indicated. According to research from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), these changes could affect the ability of the placenta to develop blood vessels and sufficiently...

Hormone therapy linked with hearing loss in women

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been associated with hearing loss in women, a new study has found. Research from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts looked into the effects of HRT and found that 23 per cent of participants who underwent the treatment developed hearing...

Introducing an important new resource for Safer Motherhood!

FIGO is introducing a very important new resource for Safer Motherhood. After extensive testing and evaluation, FIGO’s educational platform, The Global Library of Women’s Medicine, is making available a unique Safer Motherhood APP; it is entirely FREE and we hope it will be genuinely...

Female hormones ‘may trigger migraines in adolescent girls’

Changes in female hormones may cause headaches in adolescent girls, but their effect may depend on a girl’s age and stage of pubertal development, according to a new study. Conducted by researchers at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical...

Teenager designs breast cancer-detecting bra

A teenager in Mexico has designed a bra that could detect breast cancer in women who are predisposed to the disease. Julian Rios Cantu developed the bra after his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. He then started a company with three friends to produce the bra. Speaking in a video posted on...

Folic acid throughout pregnancy ‘can boost children’s resilience’

Taking folic acid supplements throughout pregnancy enhances psychological development in children, says new research carried out by the University of Ulster, UK. According to the researchers, it is widely accepted that taking folic acid in the first trimester of pregnancy can benefit children...

FIGO supports International Day of the Midwife 2017

Statement from the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) on the International Day of the Midwife 2017. Please click here to view the statement.

Period tracking apps often ‘disappoint’

Smartphone apps used to track menstrual cycles are often disappointing to users, according to a new study conducted by the University of Washington (UW), US. The researchers said that many apps display a lack of accuracy, assumptions about sexual identity and partners, and “an emphasis on...

Common antibiotics linked to miscarriage risk

A number of antibiotics have been linked to an increased risk of miscarriage in early pregnancy, according to a new study. Conducted by the Université de Montréal, Canada, the research pointed to the commonly used medications macrolides, quinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides and...

Women ‘should continue to be screened for cervical cancer after 65’

A new study has found that women should continue to be screened for cervical cancer after the age of 65. The study, led by Dr Mary White, chief of the Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Georgia, US,...