News

FIGO/Chien-Tien Hsu Fellowship on Gynecologic Oncology

The Chien-Tien Hsu Research Foundation and FIGO have established a Fellowship on Gynecologic Oncology to enable young obstetricians and gynecologists - who are beginning a career in gynecologic oncology - to attend the FIGO World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics, and to visit a gynecologic...

Latest FIGO Newsletter now online!

The September 2017 issue of the FIGO Newsletter is now available online. Please click here . The FIGO President (centre) demonstrating the ‘FIGO Gyn Cancer Management’ app at the 25th Asian & Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (AOCOG), Hong Kong (June 2017), with the...

Non-medical gender-biased sex selection - a joint ICM-FIGO statement

Non-medical gender-biased sex selection A joint statement from the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). Please click here to view the statement. French version Spanish version

Acupuncture ‘ineffective at treating infertility in women with PCOS’

Acupuncture, either on its own or combined with the medication clomiphene, does not appear to be effective in treating infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a new international study. The finding has cast doubt on previous smaller trials that have suggested...

More than 2,000 cases of FGM reported in UK in first quarter of 2017

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) has reported that it saw 2,102 instances of female genital mutilation (FGM) between January and March 2017. According to the NHS, 1,236 women and girls had their FGM information collected in the Enhanced Dataset for the first time. The FGM Enhanced...

Hot flushes linked to depression

A new study has linked hot flushes to a greater risk of depression in women. The study, conducted by a group of researchers from Monash University, Australia, looked at the impact of hot flushes and a number of other independent factors on the risk of depression in women 65 or older. They found...

Breast implants ‘could affect ECG results’

New research has revealed that breast implants may impede an electrocardiogram (ECG), which could result in a false heart attack diagnosis. The study was conducted by Dr Sok-Sithikun Bun, a cardiologist at Princess Grace Hospital, Monaco, and colleagues. An ECG records the heart’s electrical...

HPV testing ‘can lead to earlier detection of cervical pre-cancer’

Women who receive human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, as well as a cervical smear, receive a faster, more complete diagnosis of possible cervical pre-cancer. This is according to a study conducted by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), UK, and the University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive...

Wellbeing of Women launches Training Grants Round for 2018

Wellbeing of Women has just launched itsTraining Grants Round for 2018 - click here for more details . FIGO and Wellbeing of Women have a Memorandum of Understanding .

HIV-positive women ‘more likely to transmit cytomegalovirus to babies’

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus (CMV) in their urine at the time of labour and delivery are more than five times likelier to transmit HIV to their babies than HIV-positive women without CMV, according to a new study led by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The researchers...

Misoprostol Dosage Chart - new release!

The new FIGO 2017 misoprostol-only dosage chart has been released! An update from the widely used 2012 chart detailing recommended dosages of misoprostol when used by itself for a variety of gynecological and obstetrical indications has been revised and expanded by an expert group and is now...

Stillbirth rate in UK falls between 2013 and 2015

The stillbirth rate in the UK fell by almost eight per cent between 2013 and 2015, according to new research. The MBRRACE-UK report found that in 2015 the stillbirth rate was 3.87 per 1,000 total births. This had fallen from 4.20 per 1,000 total births in 2013. However, the report also found that...

Late premature birth ‘increases hospitalisation risk for respiratory illness’

A new study of children up to two years of age has revealed that those born late preterm (34-36 weeks) had a significantly greater risk of recurrent hospitalisation for respiratory illness compared to those who were born full term (later than 37 weeks). It was also found that the repeat hospital...